Tuesday, April 8, 2014

People of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

Aired on The California Report Magazine April 4th, 2014:

Deep Connections to Rich Agricultural History

http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201404041630/c

Anza Borrego: Drought Takes Toll on Park Renowned for Wildflowers

Aired on The California Report Magazine March 28th, 2014

http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201403281630/c

San Diego County's Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is famous for its amazing wildflowers. But this is the third year in a row of drier-than-usual weather at Anza-Borrego and wildflowers are scarce. As Lisa Morehouse reports, that's creating some anxiety and a few opportunities for those who live near -- and love -- California's biggest state park. - See more at: http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201403281630/c#sthash.57gpaHdJ.dpuf
 Yes, it's in the desert, but Anza Borrego is best known for its amazing wildflowers.  I visited California's largest state park to learn how three years of dry weather are impacting the bloom, visitation, and the economy (and to find out if there's a silver lining).
San Diego County's Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is famous for its amazing wildflowers. But this is the third year in a row of drier-than-usual weather at Anza-Borrego and wildflowers are scarce. As Lisa Morehouse reports, that's creating some anxiety and a few opportunities for those who live near -- and love -- California's biggest state park. - See more at: http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201403281630/c#sthash.57gpaHdJ.dpuf
San Diego County's Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is famous for its amazing wildflowers. But this is the third year in a row of drier-than-usual weather at Anza-Borrego and wildflowers are scarce. As Lisa Morehouse reports, that's creating some anxiety and a few opportunities for those who live near -- and love -- California's biggest state park. - See more at: http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201403281630/c#sthash.57gpaHdJ.dpuf

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Navigating the Delta

I was drawn to California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta because most of what I’ve been reading and hearing over the years focused just on the water diversion and on the endangered species caught up in that system. About a year ago, I started driving through the Delta and became really curious about who lives there, their history and culture, and what they do for work and for fun.  KALW's Crosscurrents let me scratch that itch a bit by doing a 4-part series about the people of the Delta and the work that drives them.

Navigating the Delta Part 1: Meeting the People Who Live in California's Water Hub
Aired on KALW's Crosscurrents February 12, 2014.

http://kalw.org/post/navigating-delta-meeting-people-who-live-california-s-water-hub


Navigating the Delta Part 2: The Roots of Agriculture
Aired on KALW's Crosscurrents February 19, 2014.

http://kalw.org/post/navigating-delta-roots-agriculture


Navigating the Delta Part 3: Holding On To A Boating Economy And Culture
Aired on KALW's Crosscurrents February 19, 2014.
http://kalw.org/post/navigating-delta-holding-boating-economy-and-culture

Navigating the Delta Part 4: Levees
Aired on KALW's Crosscurrents March 6, 2014.
http://kalw.org/post/navigating-delta-where-levees-break

The Dangerous Work of Palm Workers

Aired on NPR's Latino USA on February 21, 2014.

http://latinousa.org/2014/02/21/palmeros/


It’s said that date palm trees want their feet in water, and their heads in fire. It makes sense, then that more than 90% of the dates harvested in the U.S. grow in California’s Eastern Coachella Valley. Irrigation water is pumped here from the Colorado River, and summer temperatures can top 120 degrees. I spent some time in the Eastern Coachella Valley last spring, and got curious about the history of dates here, and about the palmeros, palm workers, who tend them.

Friday, December 6, 2013

Coachella Youth and Environmental Justice

Aired on The California Report Magazine July 12, 2013:

http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201307121630/c

and on NPR's Latino USA December 6th, 2013:

http://latinousa.org/2013/12/06/data-mining-in-the-coachella-valley/

It’s not every day that a group of high school students chooses to drive around with a college professor taking pictures of sewage failure. But that’s what Uriel Gutierrez and three of his friends were doing on the day I visited them this spring. They’re showing professor Ryan Sinclair of Loma Linda University around mobile home parks that are prevalent in the Eastern Coachella Valley where they live, and they’re documenting problems to try to help their community.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

The History of Coachella's Iconic Dates

Aired on KQED's The California Report Magazine on October 25th, 2013:

http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201310251630/d



If you drive southeast of Palm Springs through the Eastern Coachella Valley, it’s easy to get a little overwhelmed by the date palm trees. They grow as tall as 70 feet, and they’re everywhere, filling thousands of acres. Dates aren’t native to the Coachella Valley, but they’ve given this region an identity and became a top crop. When I was reporting in the region last spring, I got curious about the history of date production, and about the dangerous job of the palmero, the date palm worker.

Here, also, is an audio slideshow detailing the "Arabian Fantasy" agritourism promoted by date industry boosters starting in the early 1900s.


If you drive southeast of Palm Springs through the Eastern Coachella Valley, it’s easy to get a little overwhelmed by the date palm trees. They grow as tall as 70 feet, and they’re everywhere, filling thousands of acres. Dates aren’t native to the Coachella Valley, but they’ve given this region an identity and became a top crop. - See more at: http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201310251630/d#sthash.rRucrqvm.dpuf
If you drive southeast of Palm Springs through the Eastern Coachella Valley, it’s easy to get a little overwhelmed by the date palm trees. They grow as tall as 70 feet, and they’re everywhere, filling thousands of acres. Dates aren’t native to the Coachella Valley, but they’ve given this region an identity and became a top crop. - See more at: http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201310251630/d#sthash.rRucrqvm.dpuf
If you drive southeast of Palm Springs through the Eastern Coachella Valley, it’s easy to get a little overwhelmed by the date palm trees. They grow as tall as 70 feet, and they’re everywhere, filling thousands of acres. Dates aren’t native to the Coachella Valley, but they’ve given this region an identity and became a top crop. - See more at: http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201310251630/d#sthash.rRucrqvm.dpuf

Thursday, October 24, 2013

The Doctor Is In, and Lives Down the Road

Aired on The California Report Magazine on September 20, 2013.

http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201309201630/b

and on NPR's Latino USA September 27th:

http://latinousa.org/2013/09/27/drafting-rural-doctors/


Rural California has long faced a shortage of doctors, and in the San Joaquin Valley studies show the number of primary care physicians per person is about half the state’s average. But here and there, you can find physicians who really commit to their communities. We meet a couple of dedicated rural physicians, and a collaboration to cultivate more doctors like them.

Rural California has long faced a shortage of doctors, and in the San Joaquin Valley studies show the number of primary care physicians per person is about half the state?s average. But here and there, you can find physicians who really commit to their communities. We meet a couple of dedicated rural physicians, and a collaboration to cultivate more doctors like them - See more at: http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201309201630/b#sthash.6SIUV3LP.dpuf